Who Knew This Guy Was So Cool?

24 01 2010

“I want to do good. I want the world to be better because I was here.”

…That’s my favorite quote from this compilation. I hope you enjoy this video as much as I have.

Ben

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Disclosing New Worlds

17 09 2009

Literature Review:  A very profound meta-physical perspective on entrepreneurship has been developed by Spinosa, Flores and Dreyfus. In their book “Disclosing New Worlds” (1997), they analyse through what human forces our world develops and entrepreneurship is conceptualized as creating “disclosive spaces” and new practices leading to “new ways of life” and thereby allowing us to make sense of our lives.

They are focusing on the transformative force, the change-making agency of the entrepreneur. But they are less interested in analyzing the concrete rational practices but in understanding the force, the mindset, that drives the entrepreneur.

Their approach becomes more clear when we see how they set it in contrast with other approaches to entrepreneurship research for which they chose eminent representatives. First they review Peter Druckers understanding and teachings on entrepreneurship. They assess that he follows a traditional Cartesian model: Practice rests on theory. Hence an entrepreneur has to learn how to find and interpret the symptoms, so he can, just like a medical doctor, use his knowledge in order to implement the adequate practice. This is a very down-to-earth approach where entrepreneurship is understood to be a practice just like building a house. There are techniques one has to learn, e.g. to identify opportunities there are several methods Drucker describes, such as “seeing change and reacting to it”. With this method, fields of opportunity such as the growing market for elderly, or the consequences of rapidly increasing number of women in the work force, can be identified. Subsequently entrepreneurs can come up with businesses such as travel agencies for seniour citizens and designer brands for women business cloths. Spinosa, Flores and Dreyfus do not think this comes close to understanding the essence of the transformative creative change caused by entrepreneurs. Entrepreneurs don’t necessarily find or identify needs, but are intuitively convinced almost obsessed with the belief in a practice that changes the way of life. One example that they bring forward is music styles. How could anybody foresee the success of the Beatles, or any new music style for that matter, when nobody had ever heard that kind of music.

Next they review the approach of Karl Vesper, who does not attempt to develop a theory of entrepreneurship, but favors the approach of delivering a multitude of cases describing and analyzing the experience of entrepreneurs in order to transmit the entrepreneurial spirit and approach to his readers. Here Spinosa, Flores and Dreyfus acknowledge the fact that Vesper identifies a mystery encompassing special circumstances and luck as components of successful entrepreneurship. Many entrepreneurs have a sort of a moment of epiphany when they encounter an opportunity worth their venture. In Spinosas assessment Vesper falls short in analyzing this aspect.

The third wide-spread approach to academic work on entrepreneurship is exemplified by George Gilder. His work describes three elemental virtues of an entrepreneur: giving, humility, and commitment. The first can be paraphrased and is illustrated in an “what you reap is what you sow” approach as described in Senges’ (2007) forth attractor for an entrepreneurial mindset (see below). Gilder’s second virtue – humility – is meant to describe how an entrepreneur is not a high flying megalomaniac who is up in the visionary clouds, but someone who is ready to do the hard work in trenches. Lastly an entrepreneur is 100% committed to his venture’s vision and has an intuitive believe in it. It is Gilder’s take on entrepreneurship Spinosa et al. favour the most.

The problem with all these approaches is that they are work post-hoc. They look at the practices and effects of successful entrepreneurs and then they deduce commonalities. For Spinosa et al. it is much more important to understand the philosophy, or the mindset behind the entrepreneur. It is the “making of history”, the push for a new way of life entrepreneurs are dedicated to, that interests them. They go on to describe how it is not knowledge, but a sensitivity for or to anomalies they find to be the distinct attribute of an entrepreneurial mindset. Entrepreneurs have a skill to reflect upon the world and develop an innovative perspective. And it is this innovative perspective that the entrepreneur pursues with dedication, aiming at the re-configuration of the way of life of his target constituency.

In conclusion they find that the composite entrepreneur they conceptualize has the following important skills: “(1) the entrepreneur innovates by holding on to some anomaly; (2) he brings the anomaly to bear on his task, (3) he is not clear about the relation of the anomaly to the rest of what he does, and once he has a sense of a world in which the anomaly is central, such as the world of work, he embodies, produces, and markets his new understanding; (4) to do this, he preserves and tests his new understanding – for instance, by leading workshops or other kinds of discussions – to see how it fits with the wider experience than his own; (5) […] he must take his new conception and embody it in a way that preserves its sensibleness and the strangeness of the change it produces, seeing to it that he is reconfiguring the way things happen in a particular domain; (6) finally, he focuses on all dimensions of entrepreneurial activity into a styled coordination with each other and brings them into tune with his embodied conception, so that the critical distinction involved in appreciating the product becomes manifest in the company’s way of life.” (Spinosa, et al. 1997, p. 50)

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The Entrepreneurial Mindset

17 09 2009

An entrepreneurial mindset is described by a conglomerate of meta-physical dispositions, also known as entrepreneurial spirit, meant to cause the innovative and energetic practice to identify or create an opportunity and take action aimed at realizing it. The philosophical themes – existentialism, axiology, pragmatism, ethics – are thereby understood to be strange attractors influencing the construction of the entity’s persona as well as the concrete practices of the entity (Figure 1).

Figure 1:Conceptual Model of Philosophical Components of an Entrepreneurial Mindset (Senges 2007)

 

Composite Mindset Philosophy

Important for entrepreneurship is the “creative mindset” (Faltin, 2007) that helps entrepreneurs to create new ideas and bring these to the market in a way appropriate to create value for an external audience. Psychological research highlights that true creativity comes not from the kind of area in which one is active but whether one can conceive of something that is both “new and appropriate” (Amabile, 1996). In this way, a entrepreneurial mindset is a philosophy by which individuals engage in creative acts regardless of the type of work they are engaged in. Thus, the entrepreneurial mindset might exist in cooking just as well as web-2 innovating, it is the philosophy and the action it generate that counts – not the context.

This can be contrasted to a “managerial mindset” which deals with creating order and efficiency through controlling, evaluating, and administrating practices (Sarasvathy, Simon and Lave, 1998). An entrepreneurial mindset is distinct from ‘entrepreneurial cognitions’ in that the former signify a philosophy of personal identity and values whereas the latter signify a group of heuristics or decision-making tools that entrepreneurs use to evaluate and exploit business opportunities. An entrepreneurial mindset is also distinct from Entrepreneurial orientation (EO) which is a collective identity in young entrepreneurial firms that fosters innovativeness, pro-activeness and risk-taking among participants in the firm (Lumpkin and Dess, 1996).

The philosophic codification of the mindset of an entrepreneur follows what Durkheim felt to be the achievement of modernity: “The possibility to dynamically differentiate and elaborate values” (Welsch, 1998). Thereby, as is customary in life-philosophy, the creative and initiative aspects meant to create meaning are given central stage in a holistic (or totalitarian) approach. Peter Sloterdijk elaborates on the role of philosophy : “Philosophy is stylizing the human being with the practice of terminological gene-technology (‘begrifflicher gentechnologie’), thereby developing new taxonomies of human existence” (Sloterdijk, 1999). He further explains that philosophy creates meta-physical concepts of human beings and their condition, which serve as archetypical development paradigms when perceived and internalized. One example given by Sloterdijk, is Freud’s creation, or the meta-physical engineering of the Oedipus complex. The proposed philosophical model of an entrepreneurial mindset is meant to contribute such a typology.

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Paul Potts, Cell Phone Warehouse MGR …Becoming Who He Was Born To Be.

19 01 2009

I am a firm believer in the capacity of mankind to do, be or become anything their hearts desire.

Of course, there are principles of belief in oneself and the power of positive thinking that must be applied, but every single human-being has the capacity and ability to apply them.

I just wanted to share this short clip about the cell
phone warehouse manager/opera singer Paul Potts.

This is very inspiring!!

Here’s To Creating A LIFE – NOT Just A Living.

…To Living YOUR Life ON PURPOSE.

…To Becoming Who YOU Were Born To Be!







Are You FREE or Only Seem To Be?

20 02 2006

Take the short questionnaire and discover how YOU CAN BE … with just a few hours of your flexible time each week, and within a relatively short amount of time!

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Do you ever find yourself thinking … “If I could just find a better way” … “I know there has got to be a better way?”

Well I’m here to tell you there IS a better way! There IS a “Plan B” and it is closer than you think!

Let me ask you this… If you knew you could legitimately be earning $2,000 to $3,000 a week and within a relatively short amount of time; would that affect your life, your family life, or maybe your time-freedom for the better?

If your answer is “yes,” then contact me right away at 864-610-0376 and let’s discuss the possibilities of life without limits.

If your answer is “no,” then I wish you well.  Continue doing what you’ve always done.
The choice is your’s, but remember… YOU ALWAYS DO HAVE A CHOICE.
To Your All-Star Success,

Benjamin  Kee
Soldier of Prosperity
864-610-0376

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About The Author: Benjamin Kee is originally from the small suburb town of Elkhart, Indian. He is the oldest of six brothers and sisters and now calls Greenville, South Carolina home. Ben has been a professional network marketer, coach, teacher and trainer for the past eight years. He does what he loves and loves what does and believes that is one of the biggest secrets to his success. That wasn’t always the case though. After having struggled in the MLM industry for over 3 years, he discovered the strategies and tactics used by the pro’s & went from simple college dropout working at Home Depot, to network marketing top producer by age 26. How you ask? It is through this site, his training material and newsletter that Ben will share the secrets of his success with you. Today Ben makes it his passion to assist others in living a life on purpose, and in doing so, realizing their true full potential and financial independence.